Mangere Bridge Open Tuesday

 

Some motorists will get their first taste of the new Mangere Bridge on Tuesday.

The NZTA says that there is still work to complete the crossing before drivers enjoy the full benefits of the improvements. It is planned to shift the first two lanes of southbound traffic on to the new bridge early on Tuesday morning,  weather dependent.

The existing bridge and the approaches will then be refurbished and finalised, with the entire motorway upgrade completed by the end of August.

Prime Minister John Key and Transport Minister Steven Joyce this morning officially opened the Manukau Harbour Crossing,  – seven months ahead of schedule.

There will be three motorway lanes each way between Walmsley Road and Queenstown Road. The duplicate bridge, however, has a fourth southbound lane dedicated to local traffic between the communities of Onehunga and Mangere Bridge. The existing bridge beside it will be refurbished to carry four northbound lanes.

Mr Joyce paid tribute to the workers who had achieved this.

The new $230 million duplicate bridge, together with existing bridge, completed in 1983, will provide 10 lanes of traffic directly over the Manukau Harbour – four lanes of general traffic in each direction, plus two bus shoulder lanes.

He said the government’s billion dollar boost to state highway funding has provided a secure funding pipeline which has given contractors the confidence to continue investing in people and machinery and complete projects more quickly.

“Realising the benefits of the Harbour Crossing project seven months early will come as a huge relief to the 80,000 motorists using the route to travel between central and South Auckland every day,” says Mr Joyce.

NZTA insist the new bridge will deliver travel time savings of up to 20 minutes in each direction between the airport and the city during peak times.

“As well as shortening the journey time for motorists and reducing transport costs for business, greater efficiencies and access to the airport will provide a real boost the economy – both regionally and nationally.”

The new $230 million duplicate bridge, together with existing bridge, completed in 1983, will provide 10 lanes of traffic directly over the Manukau Harbour – four lanes of general traffic in each direction, plus two bus shoulder lanes.

Today the new Mangere bridge is open for a few hours to the public -and cyclists for half an hour.

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11 Comments

 
  1. patrick says:

    so does it open to traffic on the 31st of August as the signs on the motorway say

  2. Jon C says:

    @Patrick That’s the date they are giving.

  3. Patrick says:

    Cool, a few years of easy driving pleasure.

    Then induced demand will clog it up again, and the trucking industry will be demanding the 10 lanes be extended to Waterview and Manukau. So as to release the full potential of that $230m investment.

    Cool, a few years of more easy driving pleasure.

    Then induced demand will clog it up again, and the trucking industry will be demanding 10 lanes be doubled to 20 lanes,. So to get that 20 minute time saving back.

    Cool, a ….

  4. Carl says:

    on a technical note, does a head of schedule generally mean under budget? I’m thinking in labour and time costs?

  5. jarbury says:

    NZTA insist the new bridge will deliver travel time savings of up to 20 minutes in each direction between the airport and the city during peak times.

    Hahahahahahahahaha….. I wonder if they ever actually go back and see whether these massively optimistic forecasts are real.

  6. jon r says:

    NZTA never go back to see if their forecasts are real. They spend taxpayers money to the tune of billions … and it’s all a gamble.

  7. harry_64 says:

    According to the guy on the bridge we talked to today the new bridge will be open to traffic on Tuesday (27 July I assume) with a few weeks to reseal and remove the barriers etc on the old bridge then the whole thing will be open and good to go at the end of August.

  8. Geoff says:

    How do you save 20 minutes getting to the city, when Queenstown Rd is still the same two lanes it always was. This bridge will just mean the congestion point relocates. There won’t be any time at all saved.

  9. karl says:

    “How do you save 20 minutes getting to the city, when Queenstown Rd is still the same two lanes it always was.”

    MOTORWAY TO THE CITY! MOTORWAY TO THE CITY!

    Wheeew, and there we were thinking for a second there we were running out of projects!

  10. Joshua says:

    karl, there are now a few routes to the city from the airport, dominon rd, hillsbrough though mt eden road, and queenstown rd through gillies ave. Considering I’ve spend a considerable amount of time in traffic on this motorway I can already see the time saving benefit and the bridge is not open yet. It has saved me 15min getting home in peak traffic heading towards the city after 3 laning opened, and thats going 80km.

    The fact is this project was needed, they have improved the connection, (i’m still gutted they didn’t do rail line at same time), improved community access to waterfront, improved cycle and pedestrian connections. In all it’s a good achievement.

    I know the project time savings wont last forever, but it’s a big relief for motorist who drive the route daily, and this project was not one moving the bottleneck forward, rather than eliminating a bottleneck between the connection. there was and always will be a bottleneck on Pa Rd, or at least until PT takes on a greater role.

  11. karl says:

    I know - and I don’t disagree that there will be benefits. But allow me a bit of tongue-in-cheek over the fact that this country keeps putting more eggs into the same basket (motorways) and then asks for a bigger basket instead of a second basket.

    I will readily agree that NZTA did a LOT for walking and cycling on this project, though (and a wee bit for rail, though they had to be hassled into doing it). For me, those things will be much more valid and long-term.

 

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